• Playing With Book Covers For An Upcoming Collection

    I’ve started the editing process for my upcoming book entitled, The Postcard and Other Short Stories & Poetry. So far, I’ve organized the stories and made a comprehensive list of what will be included and what is getting pitched. It looks like the book will feature 15 longer short stories, 25 pieces of flash fiction, and about 20 poems. Along with the organization comes the idea of what the cover of the book might look like. As a visual person, I need to have this in my head as I work toward completion. For me, the whole creative process of putting a collection together encompasses so much—the storytelling is at…

  • body of water with people rowring on boat beside tall building

    Remembering Venice Through Poetry

    I think of Venice often, even though it’s been many years since I’ve been there. It was the most unique and amazing place I have ever visited; Italy in general holds a special place in my heart because both my family and my husband’s family are of Italian heritage. Many people say the Grand Canal is the most beautiful street in the world; I think they may be right. Last year, in my Poetry class, we were asked to write a haibun and a haiku that flowed together. As we could choose any subject to write about, Venice was my choice. When I travel, I keep a copious journal, so…

  • The Things He Cherished

    *** I suppose I’ve always had a fascination for living near the water, and it shows up in my writing. Inn Significant, my latest novel, is set in an Inn on the Tred Avon River in Oxford, Maryland, and features a love story within a love story. There’s something wholly romantic about living near the water, the peacefulness of it all, and the sentimental feelings I have about it come out in my storytelling. Today, I thought I’d feature the first poem I ever had published a few years ago. I’ve been writing poetry for ages (I think my earliest poem dates back to 6th grade), but I don’t often…

  • For Graduates: There is Always A Place For You

    * * * At college and university graduations across the country, ceremonies will be chock full of great quotes, wonderful inspirational sentiments, and often excerpts of poetry. Robert Frost’s poem, “The Road Not Taken,” is a popular favorite—and an amazing poem. However, for my graduates who are about to enter the working world or continue on to graduate school, this little poem has always been one of my favorites by Anne Campbell. I share it with you now as I wish you well, hope you have wonderful successes and happiness ahead of you, and cherish the times we shared at Stevenson. Remember: there is always a place for you.  There…

  • Opening The Door to Love or Closing the Door to Love

    * * * In celebration of Valentine’s Day this weekend, instead of a little Friday Fiction, I’m featuring two poems I wrote. I don’t write poetry as much as I did when I was younger, but every once in a while I’m moved to write something. The first poem is about opening up to love in Dr. Seuss rhyming style, and the second is about closing the door to love and being brokenhearted in prose style. I figured I’d cover both bases. Hope yours is rather more like the former and less like the latter.  Happy Valentine’s Weekend… If Only You Dare | by S. Verni Love can grow from…

  • Pretty Things, Poetry, and Handmade Valentines

    P R E T T Y   T H I N G S Yesterday, after having been stuck in our home for several days due to the enormous dumping of snow we received over the weekend, the kids and I got out of the house. We ended up running a couple of errands, then stopped at Target. In their “discount” area when you first walk in, they had some pretty things in shades of turquoise, pinks, reds, golds, and it got me in the spirit for Valentine’s Day, which is coming up soon. I also bought some feminine office supplies, because typically office supplies aren’t really that attractive, but these were…

  • Five * Seven * Five

    Five. Seven. Five. That’s the typical length of a haiku. Five syllables make up the first line, seven make up the second, and five again make up the third. When you write novels, you have pages and pages to tell a story; in a short story, you have much less time, and in poetry, you have lines. I’m posting three haikus I’ve written that I like best. I hope you like them, and even more so, that I inspire you to write one of your own. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Haiku: BlizzardWhite winter blizzardcovers moonlit landscape, still;boots thaw by the fire. * * * Haiku: One with VeneziaHeels tap streets, click, click—gondolier sings…

  • Come with Me to Touch the Sky

    Come with me to touch the sky, You need not travel far and wide. I’m here, with you, wherever you go— Though this you probably already know. No words are needed for you and I, We’ve said our hellos; we’ve said our goodbyes— But on the rare chance that you can’t fly, Just look above, and touch the sky. I wrote this poem a while ago. Some folks despise rhyming poetry and prefer the more free-flowing style. While I enjoy that type of poetry as well, I’m a big fan of the rhyme—it’s probably all those years I was in love with Dr. Seuss as a child and the poetry…

  • Okay. Okay. I’ll Come.

    * * * I know what Maya Angelou meant here. There are times when you sit down to write and nothing comes. Then, there are times when your fingers can’t type as quickly as your brain is working, and the fingers have trouble keeping up with the thoughts that barrel through you. We lost a great sage, writing influence, and someone with limitless amounts of creativity. Her influence will be missed. * * * * * * In Memory of Maya Angelou, A Poem The ideas don’t flow the way they should; Noise litters your head— An angry word, a moment of doubt— Insecurities pounding, wanting to come in. Yet…

  • The Best Advice You Ever Got

    The best advice you ever got— And over the years you’ve heard a lot— Didn’t come in the way of a bang and pop! Didn’t come among a fertile crop. It didn’t call out in the dead of night When creepy crawlers come out to bite. It wasn’t seen among the stars— The moon, Jupiter or dusty Mars. It didn’t have legs and walk away, It stayed to face interminable days. It helped you survive the bleakest clouds, When you wanted to quit, but then said aloud, That what you’ve lost wasn’t meant to be, In pain, you cry, the dichotomy. One side, like a coin; do not to toss…

  • A Gift From the Sky

    I don’t have a problem blogging or writing stories and sharing it all. Poetry, on the other hand, is entirely different. Allen Ginsberg was right about that, for sure. Poetry forces you to bare your soul, and it often makes me uncomfortable. Today, I’m forcing myself to be a little uncomfortable by sharing a poem I wrote a few years ago. Why? Because, as I try to teach my students, sometimes we have to step out of our comfort zone and do something…different. Gift from the Sky Sometimes something magical happens, And you can’t explain why. From Heaven above Comes a gift from the sky. A friend all your own,…

  • More and Less in 2014

    We’ve all got those pesky resolutions. Here are mine, in no particular order. A little more and a little less in 2014. Write more Curse less Love more Bitch less Exercise more Eat less Pray more Crash the car less Landscape more Weed less Play board games more Expect less Pamper more Digress less Organize more Need less Use sunscreen more Complain less Go on date nights more Use Facebook less Find contentment more Compare less Say “bliss” more And “miss” less.